Meet the E-Board: Co-VP of Operations

 

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My name is Esha and I will be co-VP of Operations and Events working alongside Nicole for the upcoming year! I am a rising junior in Questrom planning to concentrate in Marketing and Finance. I joined herNetwork and was on the Executive Board last year, and it has been an amazing experience getting to know this motivated group of women. I’m from a coastal town in Connecticut, so I love going to the beach but have also really enjoyed exploring the city of Boston. I cannot wait to meet all of you and continue working with our awesome Eboard this coming year!

 

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Business, Fashion, and Achieving Your Goals with CEO of UNItiques, Alex Shadrow!

Written by: Minna Tang

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  1. You will be on Her Network’s fashion panel at our Women Mean Business Conference– what do entrepreneurship and fashion mean to you?

Entrepreneurship: The lesson I have learned is never getting beaten down. I often feel threatened to quit when I look at my friends because “9 to 5” is tempting. They can relax and not worry about anything after work, but for me, I am stressed out by my work because I can never relax from it. However, “9 to 5” is always going to be there. Although I am always working, I know I am doing things I love and believe in. UNItiques is a brand new concept. There is no formula to tell me what I should do with the mistakes and failures I have been encountering along the way. Therefore, not being afraid of those uncertainties and never letting them get in your way is important. Instead of letting those mistakes stop you, sometimes you just need to find a new way.

Fashion: I am very frustrated with what is happening in the fashion industry now. Big companies have the money to make things overnight, but it does not matter to them whether these clothing items will be sold or not because they have enough money. The whole process, in my opinion, is such a waste. Clothing can and should have more of the life, in terms of the ownership. The value of UNItiques is that we want people to be more responsible with fashion and be more conscious with what they are buying and using. With the great potential UNItiques has, we will be able to create a database to be able to provide suggestions to some big companies to avoid the waste we just talked about.

 

  1. How do you draw interns to Unitiques?

One thing I learned in college is two-way communication. When we walk past a billboard, we can talk about it with people, but we cannot respond to it. Therefore, an interactive campaign is the key. The purpose of [posting on Facebook is] to find an intern for Unitiques. However, instead of going out and looking for the right person, I chose to let people come to me. When I see people putting down “marketing” or “advertising” [as interests], I will reply to them and tell them “Hey, UNItique is hiring an intern and this is an awesome place to work for!”

 

  1. Have you ever being overlooked in the business world because you are a girl?

Sometimes when I try to give a pitch to people, they say to me: “Your idea is impressive for a girl!” or “I never see girls do that!” Those words often make girls feel that they cannot even enter the business world because this is not a field for girls. What is happening to UNItiques now is that our male-dominated companies do not even consider us as a competitor. Speaking from personal experience, some of my male friends have asked me: “Why do you even bother to do this?” If I were a guy, however, I would definitely not be so discouraged. To solve this issue, I hold my head up high and make an army of supporters! Although many people doubt me because of my gender, there are more people out there that believe in me and in UNItiques.

 

  1. How did you balance school work and Unitiques? How do you balance your work and your personal life now?

There is no a perfect way, so we should just go find and create one balance that works for us. One important thing to remember is never putting too much on your plate immediately. When I created UNItiques, I became a part-time student right away because I knew that I needed to focus more on it if I want to make UNItiques successful. In life, you only get things you ask for. Since I was spending so much time and effort on UNItiques, I was asking BU to get independent study credit for it. There was never such a thing as independent credits before me, so I had to convince different people that what I was doing was worth the credits. One year later, I got the credits. Since then, BU has started giving out students credits for their independent studies. If there is no solution, create your own solution! Taking an initiative is like throwing a fishing hook out there, something will come eventually.

 

You can support Alex and UNItiques by joining UNItiques.com.                                                 Use promo code: HERNETWORK to win $200 in free concert tickets!

 

Meet Yun Chi, Graphic Designer at Chegg

Written by: Kylie Wilson

As a continuation of our “Women of Chegg” mini-series, we chose to interview Yun Chi, graphic designer at Chegg. We interviewed her to learn about where she started her career, some of the personal struggles she’s encountered, and what tips and tricks she has for other women in business.

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“Asking for help… means you are mature enough to recognize other people will help make you better.”

What does your current job involve? Is there such a thing as a typical day?

I am currently a designer on the marketing team at Chegg, which means I work on trying to communicate our message to our student audience through visuals & graphics. I am always designing banners, emails, and landing pages to convince students that we understand college is hard, but we can help make it a little easier.

What was your first entry-level job in your field and how did you get it?

This is still my first job! I actually interned during the summer after graduation because I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do and thought an internship would give me some insight into another experience. I was a little hesitant to do only an internship while everyone else I knew was getting full time jobs, but it turns out, trying something different worked out so well, I haven’t left since.

What is one mistake you made along the way and what did you learn from it? 

Not reaching out for help – it seems like you’re supposed to know what you’re doing at your job and be on top of everything, do it all. The reality is, you will need help to do your job, and thinking you can do everything alone will hurt the entire team. Asking for help doesn’t mean you don’t know how to do your job or you can’t handle it – it means you are mature enough to recognize other people will help make you better.

What’s one important piece of advice for young women entering the business force?

Reach out, speak up – there are people who are willing to give you a hand along the way, and all you have to do is ask the question. Don’t hold yourself back because you are questioning some part of yourself – you are amazing and bring unique contributions that are worth hearing about.

Have you ever had to deal with sexism as a woman in the business world? If so, how did you deal with it?

What is hard for me to grasp is realizing when sexism happens – often I don’t understand it until after the situation is over, sometimes out of shock, sometimes because I’m in an unfamiliar situation. I’m still learning, but knowing when something is inappropriate and speaking up to make sure people understand why it is inappropriate helps keep everyone accountable for making improvements going forward.

Ending Note from herNetwork:

Though the thought of reaching out and speaking up may make you think you seem inferior compared to your peers or employees, it actually makes you stand out positively. Speaking up shows you are eager to learn and capable of taking on more work, which could lead to a promotion in the future. Also, speaking up shows people you are strong because you are fighting for your idea. A good place to start is in class. Participate to show your professors you work hard. It is a waste to hide your knowledge from your professors by not speaking in class.

Shoutout to Jasmine Pansoy, Social Media Specialist at Chegg

Next in our “Women of Chegg” mini-series, we chose to interview Jasmine Pansoy, social media specialist for Chegg. We asked about where she started her career, some of the personal struggles she’s encountered, and what tips and tricks she has for other women in business.

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“Knowledge is power. And the more you know, the more creative and                     
innovative you can be.”

What does your current job involve? Is there such a thing as a typical day?

I’m the Social Media Specialist for Chegg and I’m the brand’s voice on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. In the life of social media, things change so rapidly that I have to anticipate being able to change creative and copy on the fly as well as jumping onto current conversations that are happening in real time.

What was your first entry-level job in your field and how did you get it?

My first entry-level job in my field was a beauty editor for a startup in San Francisco. When I was in college, I had an overwhelming interest in makeup and videos. This was in the early ages of YouTube and was a creative outlet for me while I was in college. I built a personal brand online and reached out to the startup with no expectations, but hope that they would have space for me on their team with the skills I developed in graphic design school and from my own personal interests. Thankfully, it paid off!

What is one mistake you made along the way and what did you learn from it? 

One of my biggest mistakes I’ve made for myself along my career path is doubt within myself. Just because I was young and inexperienced in the post-college world, I didn’t believe in my talents as much as I should have.

What’s one important piece of advice for young women entering the business force?

One important piece of advice for young women entering the business force is to learn as many aspects of your chosen field. Knowledge is power and the more you know, the more creative and innovative you can be.

Have you ever had to deal with sexism as a woman in the business world? If so, how did you deal with it?

Unfortunately, I did have to deal with sexism in the business world. Working in beauty has its challenges, and unfortunately physical appearance plays a role in your position on your career regardless of your skillset and education. I chose to leave the environment when I was confronted with sexism. Life is too short to be stifled by prejudice.

What’s something women can do to get ahead before their getting first job in a business environment?

I believe women should learn and hone in on their strongest skills before getting their first job in a business environment. By being a master in your skills, you will exude the confidence and follow-through necessary for you to prove yourself.

Ending Note from herNetwork:

You can go far if you hone in on your passions instead of hiding them. Jasmine’s passion for makeup inspired her to enter the YouTube community, and the experience she gained from making videos and making a brand for herself led her to her first job as a beauty editor. Use your talents and interests to your advantage. Don’t doubt yourself if you’ve never even tapped into your passions. The potential for you to be great is unknown, and shoving them away before you’ve pushed yourself to new limits only hurts you.

Shout out to Christina Lee, VP of Marketing at Chegg

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Written by: Kylie Wilson

As a continuation of our “Women of Chegg” mini-series, we chose to interview Christina Lee, Chegg’s VP of marketing. We interviewed her to learn about where she started her career, some of the personal struggles she’s encountered, and what tips and tricks she has for other women in business.

                     “Assume nothing. By not assuming, everything and anything works                                                                        for you versus against you.”                                                             – Christina Lee

What does your current job involve? Is there such a thing as a typical day?

Understanding what college students need, especially when it relates to helping them get into school, get through school, and find a job once they get out of school. Essentially, my job is to connect them to Chegg, which makes their job as a student easier. It’s win for Chegg and a win for students.

Every day I get a feel for how we are performing from a business front and work with all the teams to help them solve the problems. However, problems vary all the time. Some days we don’t have enough people to get a job done, or things don’t perform the way we expect them to. I have to figure out what’s causing the problem and continually support my teams to help them be successful.

What was your first entry-level job in your field and how did you get it?

After college, I went overseas to Hong Kong to work for a real estate company doing the marketing for their offices. Eventually, I got more into the tech side of business because the Internet was beginning to boom. I saw this as an opportunity to get into technology, so I decided to create a website for the company even though it wasn’t part of my job. I was able to combine my marketing skills with my new-found interest in tech.

What is one mistake you made along the way and what did you learn from it? 

I believe you should know really well what you do inside and out to master a job. My mistake is I wish I learned the technical side of things earlier in my life. Eventually I learned about coding, media, and tech, but it was after my career had already started. I wish I had had exposure to tech earlier to help me solve problems better and earlier.

What’s one important piece of advice for young women entering the business force?

Assume nothing. Don’t assume you are being discriminated against because it can keep you from speaking up. Just think about what you bring to the table, what makes you the best fit, and prepare for a job earlier to become the most valuable person for it. If you have an interest then learn about it. Don’t do it last minute.

Have you ever had to deal with sexism as a woman in the business world? If so, how did you deal with it?

As a leader that works in tech a lot, many times I am the only female in the room. I don’t let discrimination impact how I think, so I don’t find it a problem for me to speak up. By not assuming, everything and anything works for you versus against you.

What’s something women can do to get ahead before their getting first job in a business environment?

Look into technology. Even if you don’t code, you’ll understand what engineers care about and inside out what matters. Knowing the backbone of coding gives you a better appreciation of what people bring to the table. Therefore, your ability to support and communicate with tech teams is heightened. Your overall communication and decision-making skills will be improved, which helps immensely in your career.

Ending Note from herNetwork:
At first glance, you may not think marketing involves code. Even if coding isn’t your thing (it certainly isn’t mine), understanding what goes into creating a program and the basics of how it is done is extremely beneficial. You don’t even have to be a coding expert. Beginner’s courses and languages are the perfect place to start. And what’s so cool about tech is that it’s so accessible. The Internet allows you to learn things online, like coding, so there are virtually no barriers. There are many entry paths through the Internet, but your success depends on whether you are willing to invest your time in it. Don’t let anything hold you back because you have such a great tool to utilize.

Shout Out to Lila Barton, Marketing Manager of Chegg

As a continuation of our “Women of Chegg” mini-series, we chose to interview Lila Barton, marketing manager of Chegg. We interviewed her to learn about where she started her career, some of the personal struggles she’s encountered, and what tips and tricks she has for other women in business.

Keep track of your accomplishments and what you’re learning. It not only helps with confidence, but also you won’t forget the times you made a difference.”

-Lila Barton

 

What does your current job involve? Is there such a thing as a typical day?

There’s really no typical day for me, but most of the time I’m making sure that all of our campaigns are organized and set to launch on time. This means talking with partners, working with our design, email, and product teams, as well as going over every detail with our legal team. I also spend a lot of my time planning for upcoming campaigns, which also means working with partners to discuss goals, timing, and overall planning for execution.

What was your first entry-level job in your field and how did you get it?

My first job was as an account manager at Levo League. I got the job by reaching out to them and asking for it! I heard the founders speak at a Stanford Women in Business conference, and I was so excited by their mission. I applied for their summer internships then sent a follow up note saying I was graduating and wanted to work over the summer in hopes that it would turn into a full time job. And it did

What is one mistake you made along the way and what did you learn from it? 

I think before I speak, sometimes too much, then someone ends up saying what I wanted to say. I’ve been given feedback multiple times that I need to speak up more, and I’m just starting to get comfortable doing it. But if there’s something on the tip of your tongue there’s a reason you’re thinking it. It doesn’t matter if you don’t think it’s a perfect idea or solution – your “not fully developed” idea might trigger someone else to think of something different, leading to the brilliant idea.

The other mistake I made was not giving myself enough credit early in my career. This mistake resulted in not getting a promotion I thought I deserved – I held myself back and they hired someone else instead.

What’s one important piece of advice for young women entering the business force?

Keep track of your accomplishments and what you’re learning. Jot them down at the end of every week! I wish I had started this earlier. It not only helps with confidence (and negotiations!), but also you won’t forget the times you made a difference.

Have you ever had to deal with sexism as a woman in the business world? If so, how did you deal with it?

My first company was all about helping young women succeed, and at Chegg I’m surrounded by fantastic female leaders and mentors. I’ve been fortunate to not have to deal with it as much as others, but little things happen every now and then.

One thing that’s helped me is finding a partner who supports me – my fiancé is the best! He is so proud of my accomplishments at work, even if I think they’re small. I don’t let other little bumps bother me because the women and men close to me are so supportive. If you ever have a self-doubting moment, just quietly sing some Beyoncé – “Who runs the world? Girls.”

What’s something women can do to get ahead before their getting first job in a business environment?

Do your research! Know everything you can about a company before your interview. Internships also help. I wasn’t able to get many summer internships because I was a competitive athlete all through college. If the same is true for you, use an internship as a test for a full time job. Tell them you will work as an intern with the intention of it turning into a job offer. You never know!

Ending Note from herNetwork:

It can be difficult to keep your confidence up when you feel like your work is not a major contribution to a company. But just because you don’t notice the difference you make, does not mean others don’t! A good self-esteem booster is to “keep track of your accomplishments and what you’re learning” (Lila). That way, you can remind yourself of the great work you have done and how much progress you have made since starting the job. And if you need a quick pick me up, “just quietly sing some Beyoncé” (Lila).

 

Interview with Alison Kwan: herNetwork BU Alum

by: Kaitlyn Locke

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Alison, who graduated from BU this past May with a degree in Business Administration and a concentration in marketing, spent two years of her undergraduate career on the herNetwork eBoard. She worked as VP of Operations her junior year and as VP of Marketing her senior year. Now, Alison is an Account Executive at TMP Worldwide, a digital marketing agency focused on recruitment and employment marketing, where she works directly with clients and media partners to manage their advertising campaigns. We asked Alison to reflect back on her time as a Terrier and to talk about what her transition into the working world has been like.

 

In what ways did your time at herNetwork help give you a clearer picture of what kind of career you wanted after graduation?

Attending our monthly events, and especially our annual spring conference, definitely gave me a lot of exposure to different industries and careers. I sat in on the agency marketing panel at the spring conference of my senior year, and I loved learning about each panelist’s unique role. They all mentioned how each day was different, and that really appealed to me.

 

Besides herNetwork, what undergrad experience had the biggest impact on you during your time at BU, personally and/or professionally? Why?

Studying abroad in Shanghai, China had a huge impact on my undergrad experience. I got to experience a completely different culture while being pushed out of my comfort zone. Because I studied abroad during the spring semester of my junior year, I knew that finding an internship to return home to would be very important. It was difficult to interview only via phone and Skype, especially with a 12-hour time difference, but it undoubtedly helped my job search and interview skills. I sent out cold emails to many companies, and then spent a lot of time doing virtual interviews at night. When you interview via phone and Skype, you have to find ways to make your personality and confidence stand out. This experience taught me a lot about perseverance.

 

What was one surprise you encountered when you transitioned from being a full-time student to a full-time employee in the working world? How did you adjust to this?

Every day is different in the working world, and while you may be working on longer projects, they don’t have the same rigid start and end dates as school projects and exams. Also, the things you work on don’t just affect your grades – they affect real marketing campaigns and are being measured for their success and effectiveness. Overall, it’s great to feel like you’re really able to apply what you’ve learned and practiced in school to real-world projects.

What is the biggest piece of advice you would like to pass on to young, career-oriented women currently at BU?

Definitely think outside the box to find the internship or job that you want, and don’t give up! Don’t be afraid to reach out first to companies or your network – it shows initiative. Also, be open-minded in your job search. No job is going to be 100% perfect, but working with great people makes all the difference. Always be open-minded about what you can learn from each experience!